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worldpeaces:

cuddling is so perfect when you think about it because you get really close to someone you love and it’s like saying “hey human, theres a lot of humans in the world but you’re my human and i love you”

(Source: worldpeaces, via b-itchdere)

— 4 hours ago with 49167 notes

chicagno:

when a casual conversation with your parents turns into a lectureimage

(via officialfrenchtoast)

— 4 hours ago with 64901 notes
"

Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. I only just heard the sad, sad news of Robin Williams’s death. My wife sent me a message to tell me he had died, and, when I asked her what he died from, she told me something that nobody in the news seems to be talking about.

When people die from cancer, their cause of death can be various horrible things – seizure, stroke, pneumonia – and when someone dies after battling cancer, and people ask “How did they die?”, you never hear anyone say “pulmonary embolism”, the answer is always “cancer”. A Pulmonary Embolism can be the final cause of death with some cancers, but when a friend of mine died from cancer, he died from cancer. That was it. And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.

The word “suicide” gives many people the impression that “it was his own decision,” or “he chose to die, whereas most people with cancer fight to live.” And, because Depression is still such a misunderstood condition, you can hardly blame people for not really understanding. Just a quick search on Twitter will show how many people have little sympathy for those who commit suicide…

But, just as a Pulmonary Embolism is a fatal symptom of cancer, suicide is a fatal symptom of Depression. Depression is an illness, not a choice of lifestyle. You can’t just “cheer up” with depression, just as you can’t choose not to have cancer. When someone commits suicide as a result of Depression, they die from Depression – an illness that kills millions each year. It is hard to know exactly how many people actually die from Depression each year because the figures and statistics only seem to show how many people die from “suicide” each year (and you don’t necessarily have to suffer Depression to commit suicide, it’s usually just implied). But considering that one person commits suicide every 14 minutes in the US alone, we clearly need to do more to battle this illness, and the stigmas that continue to surround it. Perhaps Depression might lose some its “it was his own fault” stigma, if we start focussing on the illness, rather than the symptom. Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. He died from Depression*. It wasn’t his choice to suffer that.

"
— 4 hours ago with 153957 notes
justbeingfabulous:

just give me the fucking pancakes 

justbeingfabulous:

just give me the fucking pancakes 

(Source: fussybabybitch, via maraschino-virgin)

— 4 hours ago with 93489 notes

adamchasefields:

Brendon Urie // Panic! At The Disco @ adamchasefields

(via marvelousmerriment)

— 4 hours ago with 335 notes

tumblingrandomly:

bloodyshae:

moarrrmagazine:

Oooops! Do you know what your kids are reading?
Inappropriate Books For Kids That Actually Exist

Omfg laughed so hard

What the fuck?!

(via lifeguardinthesharktank)

— 4 hours ago with 179170 notes
afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.
Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.

Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

(via bigbootsandscaryeyes)

— 4 hours ago with 4678 notes

gr4ceffa:

this video was a ride from start to finish

(via passion56321)

— 4 hours ago with 121499 notes
kingjaffejoffer:

Remember this when you read reports of people ‘looting’ McDonalds tomorrow

kingjaffejoffer:

Remember this when you read reports of people ‘looting’ McDonalds tomorrow

(via maraschino-virgin)

— 4 hours ago with 148667 notes

lordbape:

sending “I hope you get that job” vibes to the children out here tryna get jobs

(via lifeguardinthesharktank)

— 4 hours ago with 18324 notes